Keeping up with the Blog


Not an easy thing, a big commitment with so much other stuff going on. I totally neglected to publish anything about Iceland.

In due time.

We just cam back from Sicily, in a small town called Trapani, covering the Misteri, to the Passion of Christ. We were part of Ernesto Bazan’s workshop.

He asked me to work only B&W, and to set the camera so color did not show to my eyes. I also made the decision to use only one lens, the Sony/Zeiss 55mmf/1.8

Interesting for sure. It was never my choice of all purpose lens, but this was the only way to find out. As it happens, I was pretty please with the framing, except that it was not easy to shoot the madness, if I may say. Beautiful people, lots of good vibes and an experience we will never forget.

Here is the main body of work from the workshop, curated by Maestro Bazan. This is the second version of music, the one I had in mind from the beginning. First version was made with Gregorian chants, at a faster pace and not exactly my kind of thing. There may be a third version with the “anacatta” or procession beat. Or maybe, as a friend suggested, Italian music with the same beat. Will see. When time allows!

So here, enjoy, it is short, but very painful to make.

 

Antigua Holy Week in B&W


You may be thinking why we are doing so many slides shows, we have food that it is such fun sharing the pictures like this, with music and a little bang.

The pictures here were all converted to B&W in LR and finished in Silver Efex Pro 2. Grain was added to many for mood and so was the borders.

We had done a show in color, but it is always nice to play in monochrome, especially when using the color controls in LR.

Enjoy!

Impossible Love


This slide show was created during the Miami Street Photography Festival, in Maggie Steber workshop “Miami Mystery”, run by the Leica Akademie and co-led by Tom A. Smith.

Two wonderful teachers, and a week of excitement. This is the third time I take this w/s and hopefully nor the last.

Music by Melody Gardot)

Please view HD.

My appreciation to Jon Saxx (musician in the story and in real life)  www.jonsaxx.com

and the beautiful lady with the black shoes.

Wynnwood, during Art Basel

 

Enjoy!

Oaxaca, dance of colors


The celebration of the Day of the Dead could be very colorful, especially on the “comparsa” nights, where there is even a custom contest, with the make-up school participating and having a very animated march of laughter, joy and music.
Here are some of the masquerades, another time I will add anecdotes, which are always there.
Enjoy!
OAX passingmem

OAXmimo

OAX pancho

OAX littlenightmusic

OAX kiss

OAX hairdofromback

OAX greenface

OAX girlyellow

OAX Frida

OAX deathtunnel

OAX Catrinamezcal

OAX catrinacell

OAX bridelastnight

OAX bitchplease

OAX bellecomparsas

OAX Fridadaytime

A Moment in the Life of Tigrito, Oaxaca


I had spotted “Tigrito” close to the Zocalo in the city of Oaxaca, Mexico, following a tall, slender man, in a hurry in the midst of a lazy pueblo morning. The tall stranger seemed to be on a mission. He and the little dog made a striking pair. I took a quick shot and continued on our way to Plaza Santo Domingo.
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A few minutes later, on the side street by the church, a second sighting. This time, the tall stranger saw me and turned his head as not to be in the picture. But that was not to stop him of keep him away from his mission.
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Looking around for things to photograph, we spotted someone lying in the sidewalk, apparently drunk, since no one around him paid any attention. In a provincial town, you do pay attention to things like that.
The guy was collapsed in front of aa Art Gallery, and as we watched (a couple of pics to be had, why not), there we are, face to face with the tall stranger with the puppy.
We said hello and learned he was an artist waiting for the gallery to open so he could deliver some of his work.
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Two seconds later, I was on the ground, trying to establish contact with the puppy and asked the Master if I could take pictures of the dog. The name was Tigrito” (small tiger) and the artiste was looking for a home for him.
Tigrito was very difficult to photograph. Not in the way our puppies are, playfully biting out fingers and turning over for a belly rub. No.

Tigrito was a street puppy. And street puppies grow up in a hurry. His eyes were constantly on his Master (Savior?) and the little eyes followed him with devotion every inch of the way as if his life depended on him. Which actually may just be the truth. The life of street dogs in our Latin countries is not easy, although every street and town has plenty of them and you can see there is a law and structure firmly held in place by the stronger ones, territories clearly marked.

My guess is that in a struggling artist life, the sudden presence of a puppy could be too big a responsibility. But I feel that in this case, the deal is sealed. Those two depend on each other and that is the way it will stay for a long time.
It was a treat to get to meet the Tigrito and his friend.
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